3D Concepts: Rapid Prototyping at Walla Walla University

3D Concepts: Rapid Prototyping at Walla Walla University

3D Concepts

Rapid Prototyping at Walla Walla University

3DConcepts is a student founded and operated rapid prototyping service in the Edward F. Cross School of Engineering at Walla Walla University. We make 3D plastic models from CAD data using Fuse Deposition Modeling (FDM) rapid prototyping technology. FDM technology was developed in the late 1980’s and grew rapidly in popularity because of the ease with which this technology produces working prototypes. The beauty of this service is that prototypes can be produced quickly and inexpensively from 3D CAD models.


About us

3DConcepts utilizes lab equipment for customer projects during time which the equipment is unoccupied by student assignments. Designed to augment the academic program, the rapid prototyping company gives students the opportunity to get practical hands-on experience. Students learn about the responsibilities for running a business, working and communicating with customers, and the technical requirements for creating prototypes. 

Because 3DConcepts is an academically based company student projects take first priority. This also means that the operating costs are lower compared to other prototyping companies. The decreased costs are passed onto the customer, which means a lower price for the same FDM quality.


Get a quote

Send us an an email with a detailed description and attached CAD files (optional).
3DConcepts@wallawalla.edu 

Any other questions? Call us!

  • (509) 527-2765 phone
  • (509) 527-2867 fax

Portfolio

These are a few examples of student projects that have been made with the 3D Printer.

By: Robert VanRaden Jr.

In this project a complete, scaled-down jet propulsion system was prototyped. The housing has two cut away sections which allow viewing of the stator and rotating shaft and impeller assembly.

By: Andrew Jabola
The UAV designed by Andrew Jabola required a very specific geometry for the nose cone. Because the nose cone needed to be hollow to save weight traditional machining would have wasted a large amount of material. Also, the complex geometry would have been very difficult to machine accurately. FDM technology created the complex geometry of the nose cone without wasting material.   

By: Gabriel Peñalba
This project involved prototyping a mask with a heat sink that could be removed. Because ABS plastic is slightly flexible the heat sink can snap into and out of the face mask just as a production version would. 


Frequently asked questions

Solid fill will lay beads of plastic right next to each other which leaves no gaps and makes your part solid. Sparse Low density and Sparse High density leave gaps between beads of plastic which makes hollow spaces on the inside of the model. Lower density parts require less material and are faster to build, however they are not as strong as a solid part.

The layers can be 7 or 10 thousandths of an inch thick.

Our machine has an 8X8X12 inch build envelope. However, large parts can be sectioned and printed in pieces that can then be bonded after printing is complete.

Yes. We can print parts for anyone.

Because 3DConcepts is part of the engineering department it may be possible to have a senior engineering student work on your project as their capstone project. To inquire about this, email 3DConcepts@wallawalla.edu and explain the project.


Privacy policy

Creating a prototype implies that you have a potentially successful idea. As such 3DConcepts wants you to feel comfortable that your ideas will be handled properly.

Parts
The CAD files submitted to 3DConcepts and the parts made from them may be seen by students. However, they will never be explicitly shown or advertised without approval.

Billing
Some information is needed for billing. Such information will be used by 3DConcepts and the University Accounting Office for no purpose other than billing.


Contact us

3DConcepts@wallawalla.edu 
(509) 527-2765 phone
(509) 527-2867 fax

Walla Walla University
School of Engineering
204 S. College Ave.
College Place, WA 99324

Last update on June 20, 2017